Math By Mail

In 2010, 30 students from Leibler Yavneh College in Melbourne, Sydney Grammar, and Ascham in Sydney participated in the Math by Mail program, a distance-learning program for international school students who demonstrate a genuine interest in mathematics. Students do not necessarily need to achieve the highest marks in their class to participate in this program – all participants simply demonstrate a real curiosity for the subject.

Established for over 27 years, the premise of Math by Mail is simple. Each year, Weizmann mathematicians create challenging, fun booklets that are distributed via the internet (or by mail) throughout the year to keen maths students between the third and ninth grades of school. Once each booklet is completed, it is returned to the team of PhD mathematicians who review the booklet and add their comments for feedback. This one-on-one contact not only stimulates and inspires the students, but it further boosts their confidence, as experienced math mentors take the time to assess their hard work.

Students also receive access to the bespoke Math by Mail website, which offers a supportive forum to discuss math issues at hand with other students from across the globe, and with Weizmann mathematicians.

It is easy to get involved: interested schools simply register their interest through WEIZMANN AUSTRALIA. Then each school offers the program to students who show a keen interest in mathematics. These students will go on to complete a series of four maths booklets, which are distributed over the course of a year. For more information, please contact WEIZMANN AUSTRALIA.

And for more on-line details and a Math by Mail demo:

http://davidson.weizmann.ac.il/en/content/math-mail

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