Imaging Study Finds Unique Brain Patterns Among Autistic

March 18, 2015

Unfortunately, Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) remains a condition that presents more questions than answers. Some studies have found a lack of connection or synchronisation between different parts of the brain while other studies have found the exact opposite – an over-synchronization in the brains of those with ASD.

Now, new research by scientists at the Weizmann Institute and Carnegie Mellon University suggests that the various reports of both over- and under-connectivity may, in fact, reflect a deeper principle of brain function.

The study, recently published in Nature Neuroscience, shows that the brains of individuals with autism display unique synchronisation patterns. Researchers believe this distinction may aid earlier diagnosis of the disorder and future treatments.

“Identifying brain profiles that differ from the pattern observed in typically developing individuals is crucial not only in that it allows researchers to begin to understand the differences that arise in ASD but, in this case, it opens up the possibility that there are many altered brain profiles all of which fall under the umbrella of ‘autism’ or ‘autisms,’” said Marlene Behrmann, Ph.D., co-director of the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition at Carnegie Mellon.

To investigate the issue of connectivity in ASD, the researchers analysed data obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies conducted while the participants were at rest. Data was collected from a large number of participants at multiple sites.

“Resting-state brain studies are important because that is when patterns emerge spontaneously, allowing us to see how various brain areas naturally connect and synchronise their activity,” said Avital Hahamy, a Ph.D. student in Weizmann’s Neurobiology Department.

A number of previous studies by these researchers and others suggest that these spontaneous patterns may provide a window into individual behavioural traits, including those that stray from the norm.

In a careful comparison of the details of these intricate synchronisation patterns, the scientists discovered an intriguing difference between the control and ASD groups: the control participants’ brains had substantially similar connectivity profiles across different individuals, while those with ASD showed a remarkably different phenomenon.

Those with autism tended to display much more unique patterns – each in its own, individual way. They realized that the synchronistion patterns seen in the control group were “conformist” relative to those in the ASD group, which they termed “idiosyncratic.”

Differences between the synchronisation patterns in the autism and control groups could be explained by the way individuals in the two groups interact and communicate with their environment.

“From a young age, the average, typical person’s brain networks get molded by intensive interaction with people and the mutual environmental factors,” Hahamy said.

“Such shared experiences could tend to make the synchronisation patterns in the control group’s resting brains more similar to each other. It is possible that in ASD, as interactions with the environment are disrupted, each one develops a more uniquely individualistic brain organisation pattern.”

The researchers emphasize that this explanation is only tentative; much more research will be needed to fully uncover the range of factors that may lead to ASD-related idiosyncrasies.

They also suggest that further research into how and when different individuals establish particular brain patterns could help in the future development of early diagnosis and treatment for autism disorders.

Abstract of brain photo by Shutterstock.

 

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